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Show Us Your Best Staging Photos!

Apr 15, 2018 by

Calling all stagers! Realtor Magazine is on the lookout for great examples of staging a space in some of today’s most popular home styles, from farmhouse chic to modern or contemporary. I’m looking for some real estate professionals and stagers who would be willing to show off some of their favorite staging styles.

If you have a great example of a home staged in one of the styles listed below, please contact Melissa Dittmann Tracey at mtracey@realtors.org. Share with us a room photo and some of the staging accessories you used to enhance the look. We’ll be sharing some of our favorite submissions in an upcoming guide at Realtor Magazine online.

Design Styles for Staging Photos

  • Modern
  • Farmhouse chic
  • Rustic
  • Beach house
  • Industrial
  • Traditional


Styled, Staged & Sold

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Show Us Your Best Staging Photos!

Apr 14, 2018 by

Calling all stagers! Realtor Magazine is on the lookout for great examples of staging a space in some of today’s most popular home styles, from farmhouse chic to modern or contemporary. I’m looking for some real estate professionals and stagers who would be willing to show off some of their favorite staging styles.

If you have a great example of a home staged in one of the styles listed below, please contact Melissa Dittmann Tracey at mtracey@realtors.org. Share with us a room photo and some of the staging accessories you used to enhance the look. We’ll be sharing some of our favorite submissions in an upcoming guide at Realtor Magazine online.

Design Styles for Staging Photos

  • Modern
  • Farmhouse chic
  • Rustic
  • Beach house
  • Industrial
  • Traditional


Styled, Staged & Sold

read more

Show Us Your Best Staging Photos!

Apr 13, 2018 by

Calling all stagers! Realtor Magazine is on the lookout for great examples of staging a space in some of today’s most popular home styles, from farmhouse chic to modern or contemporary. I’m looking for some real estate professionals and stagers who would be willing to show off some of their favorite staging styles.

If you have a great example of a home staged in one of the styles listed below, please contact Melissa Dittmann Tracey at mtracey@realtors.org. Share with us a room photo and some of the staging accessories you used to enhance the look. We’ll be sharing some of our favorite submissions in an upcoming guide at Realtor Magazine online.

Design Styles for Staging Photos

  • Modern
  • Farmhouse chic
  • Rustic
  • Beach house
  • Industrial
  • Traditional


Styled, Staged & Sold

read more

7 Ways to Get Your Luxury Listing Ready for Twilight Photos

Mar 14, 2016 by

By Julie Legge, real estate photographer and videographer

JulieL_2Got a new luxury listing this spring? Consider a twilight photo session to supplement your professional interior pictures. Marketing the property with pictures taken at dusk is an excellent way to highlight exterior features such as upgraded landscape lighting, pool lighting and outdoor living spaces, conveying an alluring and welcoming glow that invites interested buyers to learn more about the home.

As a real estate photographer who loves to take twilight photos, I’ve compiled the following tips to help real estate professionals work with their sellers and photographers so the session can go smoothly and produce a great result.

1. Lighting: Someone who is familiar with the interior and exterior lighting and the pool features should be present at the photo session, whether it be a home owner, real estate broker or caretaker. Arrive early to turn on all interior and exterior lighting, including landscape and pool lighting. Be prepared to turn off any lighting upon the photographer’s request. For example, some flood lights can be harsh and detract from the desired effect.

2. Pool and water features: Have the pool cleaned of debris in advance of the session. Turn on pool lighting and water features where desired. Please note that turning on water features may make some of the surrounding hardscape look wet in the pictures; if you want a consistently dry hardscape look, plan accordingly.

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3. Outdoor living features: Consider lighting fires in outdoor fireplaces. Remove grill covers — if the grill is in good condition.

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4. Outdoor furniture: Remove covers from outdoor furniture and add chair cushions. Straighten pool and lounge chairs and arrange any side tables. Consider staging any tables with clean rolled towels and refreshments. Open pool umbrellas where they will not block important views.

5. Landscaping: Add flowering or green plants to empty planters and remove dead plants. Turn off yard irrigation and do not water flowers less than two hours prior to the photo session as driveways and patios that are partially wet or partially dry may not be optimal for pictures. Arrange for professional lawn care to occur at least a day prior to the session. If appropriate, replace mulch or other landscaping enhancements.

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6. Other exterior tips: As with a daytime photo session, park vehicles in the garage with the garage door closed, or park on the street away from the front of the home. Pick up any toys from the yard, i.e. plastic children’s toys, balls and soccer goals. Sweep porches, patios, driveways and front walkways if necessary.

7. Advance preparation is key: Remember that the time window for twilight photos is short, so the property should be ready for photos in advance of the appointment.

As always, talk to your photographer about the property’s features and get additional helpful tips from her as you plan the session. If you need visual inspiration, check out photos of luxury homes in magazines or online, or see my online portfolio of twilight photos.

phpH8TcVJAMABOUT THE AUTHOR: Julie Legge is a professional real estate photographer in Charlotte, N.C. She’s photographed 1,000 homes for real estate brokers, builders, home stagers, and interior designers, and she coaches beginning photographers. Visit her web site: www.charlotterealestatephotos.com.

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Top 10 Tips for Staging a Home for Photos

Nov 30, 2015 by

By Justin Riordan, Spade and Archer Design Agency

Ah, yes the beloved Top 10 list. If only life were that simple and any skill you ever wanted to learn could be perfected with just 10 easy to learn, neatly packaged tips. I can see it now… “The top 10 tips for removing your own brain tumor” or “The top 10 tips for raising the dead.” Now don’t get me wrong — I don’t think that having your house photographed is as complicated as brain surgery or necromancy but it is often best left to the professionals. However, if you find yourself without a professional and needing to prepare your house for photographs either for a vacation rental, to sell it, or to just show off your new digs to friends and family, here are Spade and Archer’s top 10 tips on how to best get’r done.

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Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

1. Design for the camera, not for the end user

When putting together a space, we always think of the camera first. Will this angle look right, will it show off the best feature of the house? Will the light hit these items correctly? The good news is you have a camera in your pocket as you read this. When we stage a house for market, we are constantly taking photographs of it and looking at it through the camera lens. It helps us to see errors in symmetry, lighting, cleanliness, etc.

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Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

 

2. No more wrinkles

In real life, wrinkly sheets don’t make a lick of difference. You will still sleep the same and wake up refreshed, whether you iron the sheets or not. The camera, however, hates wrinkles and makes them look 100 times worse than they really are. Our best advice on this one is to use a professional steamer. The hot steam will take those wrinkles right out and makes the sheets, pillows, shower curtains, etc. all look perfect in the picture.

3. Light it up.

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Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

Light can be your best friend or your worst enemy. If you don’t know how to control it, you are destined to fail. The time of day and weather conditions can make a huge difference on how well your space photographs. If the afternoon sun is blazing into your room throwing harsh shadows all over, the shot is destined to look “blown out” with areas as dark as night and as bright as a nuclear holocaust. To help combat this problem, look for the best time for indirect sunlight outside and inside your space. Cloudy days are perfect for this. It is also a great idea to turn on your interior lights and lamps, this will help to even out the lighting in the space.

4. Fluff the carpet.

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Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

Sorry, fellas, this is not a euphemism for dining out. So often we see houses photographed with harsh vacuum lines or matted carpet that looks old and tired. The best way to fluff up your tired wall to wall is to use a broom. Running the broom over the top of the carpet in random directions will bring new life to a sagging floor textile.

 

5. Look beyond the window.

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Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

 

It’s true enough you are photographing the interiors of your space but the outside of your windows will be seen in the photos. If there are piles of trash covered with blue tarps right outside your window, they are going to come through in the photos. Clean up the areas outside the window and make it visually quiet so it does not draw attention to itself. If the area can’t be cleaned up, consider a frosted film on the window.

6. Limit the color scheme.

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Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

There are neutrals and there are colors. The neutrals are black, white, grey, brown, beige, cream, silver, and sometimes gold. You can put as many different neutrals in a room as you want. They can form a great base for your color. The colors are the rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple. Colors must be used with great restraint. We endeavor to have only one “color story” per room. A color story might be blues or reds or colors of the peacock, or teal and yellow. If you have more than one color story per room, the photographs will start to look chaotic and visually noisy.

7. Rely on symmetry, repetition, rhythm.

symmetry

Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

Symmetry, repetition, and rhythm can be found throughout nature and humans find them to be aesthetically pleasing. Symmetry can be found in most animals and insects. Repetition is why we find flowers so pleasing. Rhythm can be found in the ripples of a sand dune. A quick and easy way to make a space more aesthetically pleasing is to use these simple principles of good design.

8. Look at the problem from a different angle, then design for the best one.

angle

Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

So often when I am first training a designer, they worry about every angle that a room will be seen from. I find them paralyzed by viable arguments, both good and bad, derived from seeing a space from two vantage points. I always tell them the same thing. What is the first impression going to be? Design for that view and the rest will fall into place. Figure out where the camera will most likely be and make every decision for the room based on that. Chances are, it will turn out great.

9. Hire a professional.

hirepro

Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

It always makes me so sad when clients pay me lots of money to make their house beautiful then they run through with an iPhone and snap 16 horrible pictures of our beautiful space. I always wonder why they choose to spend thousands of dollars on staging and then value engineer (that is a euphemism for cheeping out) a photographer to save a couple hundred dollars. My best advice is if you want great photographs, hire a great photographer.

10. Put down the toilet seat.

toiletseatdown

Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

The fact that this is even on the list is nuts … yet, I still see a picture of the bathroom with the toilet seat up at least once a month. Why not just hang up a sign that says, “I suck, so don’t buy my house. Seriously, I’m super lame.” It would be just as effective.

 

 

11. Get out of the mirror.

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Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

There is really only one thing douchier than the toilet seat left up. It’s you holding an iPhone in the mirror. If you are still confused how to best correct this error, refer to No. 10: Hire a professional.

 

 

 

 

12. Furnish the house, but don’t over decorate the cake.

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Photo Credit: Spade and Archer Design Agency

Empty houses are hard to see. Furniture provides scale, shows use, and adds light to spaces. Without it, the space is just walls, windows, floors, and ceilings. It is important to show how the space is used and how big the space is. Once you have taken care of these items, then stop decorating. There is a point when the decoration is no longer about the house but more so about the decoration. Stop before you get there.

So I see I have more than 10 tips for getting good photographs for your house. Honestly, I have about 4,000 more. I wish I could teach them all to you but then again, I would be teaching myself out of a job. Good luck out there, kiddos!

 

 

headshot_JustinRiordanABOUT THE AUTHOR: Justin Riordan, LEED AP, is founder of Spade and Archer Design Agency based in Portland, Ore. As the creative energy behind Spade and Archer, Riordan fuses his formal training as an architect with his natural design savvy to create beautiful and authentic spaces for clients. Prior to opening Spade and Archer in 2009, Riordan practiced interior architecture and interior construction for 12 years, bringing an esteemed skillset and diverse background to home staging. Since founding Spade and Archer, he has personally prepared more than 2,100 homes for market.

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